Slave Houses on a Rice Plantation, U.S. South, 1859

Description

Captioned Negro Quarters, shows line of slave cabins. The inhabitants [of a rice plantation] make a large community of themselves alone. The mansion of the planter with its numerous out-houses, the residence of the overseer, and the long streets of negro cabins, give to a single settlement the aspect of a large and busy village or town . . . . [slave cabins] are usually placed, at suitable intervals, in rows, or double rows, with a wide street between... (Richards, pp. 730, 732).

Source

Harper's Monthly Magazine (1859), vol. 19, p. 730; accompanies article by T. Addison Richards, "The Rice Lands of the South" (pp. 721-38). (Copy in Special Collections Department, University of Virginia Library)"

Language

English

Rights

Image is in the public domain. Metadata is available under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International.

Identifier

NW0097

Spatial Coverage

North America--South Carolina

Citation

"Slave Houses on a Rice Plantation, U.S. South, 1859", Slavery Images: A Visual Record of the African Slave Trade and Slave Life in the Early African Diaspora, accessed April 2, 2020, http://www.slaveryimages.org/s/slaveryimages/item/1426
Captioned Negro Quarters, shows line of slave cabins. The inhabitants [of a rice plantation] make a large community of themselves alone. The mansion of the planter with its numerous out-houses, the residence of the overseer, and the long streets of negro cabins, give to a single settlement the aspect of a large and busy village or town . . . . [slave cabins] are usually placed, at suitable intervals, in rows, or double rows, with a wide street between... (Richards, pp. 730, 732).
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