Slave Auction, Richmond, Virginia, 1862

Description

Campell and Rice note that Richmond, the capital of Virginia, was the second largest slave-trading market in the South, and many visitors witnessed auctions there. This oil painting was made by an English artist, Levevre J. Cranstone (1845-1867), who probably based his painting on a work by the artist Eyre Crowe. A better reproduction, in color, is published in Estill Pennington, Look Away: reality and sentiment in Southern art (Atlanta, 1989).

Source

Published in E.D.C. Campbell, Jr. and K.S. Rice, eds., Before Freedom Came: African-american Life in the Antebellum South (Charlottesville, Univ. Press of Virginia, 1991), plate 1, p. x.

Creator

Cranstone, Levevre, J.

Language

English

Rights

Image is in the public domain. Metadata is available under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International.

Identifier

NW0245

Spatial Coverage

North America--Virginia--Richmond

Citation

"Slave Auction, Richmond, Virginia, 1862", Slavery Images: A Visual Record of the African Slave Trade and Slave Life in the Early African Diaspora, accessed April 5, 2020, http://www.slaveryimages.org/s/slaveryimages/item/1969
Campell and Rice note that Richmond, the capital of Virginia, was the second largest slave-trading market in the South, and many visitors witnessed auctions there. This oil painting was made by an English artist, Levevre J. Cranstone (1845-1867), who probably based his painting on a work by the artist Eyre Crowe. A better reproduction, in color, is published in Estill Pennington, Look Away: reality and sentiment in Southern art (Atlanta, 1989).
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