English Castle at Anamabou

Description

This engraving depicts an English fort at Anomabu in the Voltaic region. Thomas Astley (d. 1759) was a British bookseller and publisher who never went to Africa. His imagined localities and illustrations of Africa were informed by a library of travel books at his disposal. In 1698, the Royal African Company described the facilities at Anomabo, which included "twelve great guns. . . a large tank or cistern. . . and a Negroe-house for one hundred and fifty Negroes. This fort. . . opens a trade . . . for gold, corn, palm-oyl and oyster-shells; also a very great trade for slaves." See Royal Africa Company, A Particular of the Royal African Company's Forts and Castles in Africa (London, ca. 1698). By the 1770s, it was reported that "almost every room in the fort is in a rotten, ruinous condition. . . very little slave trade at present." See John Roberts, Extracts from an account of the state of the British forts, on the Gold Coast of Africa [London: Printed for J. Bew, 1778).

Source

"Plate LXIV" in Thomas Astley (ed.), A New General Collection of Voyages and Travels, vol. 2 (London, 1745-1747), facing p. 608.

Creator

Astley, Thomas

Language

English

Rights

Image is in the public domain. Metadata is available under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International.

Identifier

Astley013

Spatial Coverage

Africa--Voltaic--Anomabu

Citation

"English Castle at Anamabou", Slavery Images: A Visual Record of the African Slave Trade and Slave Life in the Early African Diaspora, accessed October 20, 2020, http://www.slaveryimages.org/s/slaveryimages/item/2087
This engraving depicts an English fort at Anomabu in the Voltaic region. Thomas Astley (d. 1759) was a British bookseller and publisher who never went to Africa. His imagined localities and illustrations of Africa were informed by a library of travel books at his disposal. In 1698, the Royal African Company described the facilities at Anomabo, which included "twelve great guns. . . a large tank or cistern. . . and a Negroe-house for one hundred and fifty Negroes. This fort. . . opens a trade . . . for gold, corn, palm-oyl and oyster-shells; also a very great trade for slaves." See Royal Africa Company, A Particular of the Royal African Company's Forts and Castles in Africa (London, ca. 1698). By the 1770s, it was reported that "almost every room in the fort is in a rotten, ruinous condition. . . very little slave trade at present." See John Roberts, Extracts from an account of the state of the British forts, on the Gold Coast of Africa [London: Printed for J. Bew, 1778).
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