Red Set-Girls, and Jack-in-the-Green

Description

This lithograph shows an elaborate procession with women holding umbrellas encircling a masquerader. Belisario wrote how "Their jewelry is not as elaborate as the Queen's, but they always wear earrings and bracelets, such lovers are they of ornaments. They start dancing in the late mornings and parade the town with little intermission till night, when they are invited to enter private houses to dance and sing. . . Refreshments and a gratuity are presented them. . . and they retire to repeat the same elsewhere till a late hour. The Jack-in-the-Green wears a costume composed of the leaves of the cocoa-nut tree, attached to hoops, diminishing in circumference to the top, which is crowned by a large bow with the addition of a couple of flags." Isaac Mendes Belisario (1795–1849) was a Jamaican artist of Jewish descent and active in Kingston Jamaica around British emancipation in 1833. The image shown here, as well as others of “John-Canoes,” was drawn from life by Belisario in 1836. This lithograph is one of twelve originally published in three parts, four plates at a time. See also image Belisario04.

Source

Isaac Mendes Belisario, Sketches of character, in illustration of the habits, occupation, and costume of the Negro population, in the island of Jamaica: drawn after nature, and in lithography (Kingston, Jamaica: Published by the artist, 1837-1838).

Creator

Belisario, Isaac Mendes

Language

English

Rights

Image is in the public domain. Metadata is available under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International.

Identifier

Belisario02

Spatial Coverage

Caribbean--Jamaica--Kingston

Citation

"Red Set-Girls, and Jack-in-the-Green", Slavery Images: A Visual Record of the African Slave Trade and Slave Life in the Early African Diaspora, accessed September 18, 2020, http://www.slaveryimages.org/s/slaveryimages/item/2308
This lithograph shows an elaborate procession with women holding umbrellas encircling a masquerader. Belisario wrote how "Their jewelry is not as elaborate as the Queen's, but they always wear earrings and bracelets, such lovers are they of ornaments. They start dancing in the late mornings and parade the town with little intermission till night, when they are invited to enter private houses to dance and sing. . . Refreshments and a gratuity are presented them. . . and they retire to repeat the same elsewhere till a late hour. The Jack-in-the-Green wears a costume composed of the leaves of the cocoa-nut tree, attached to hoops, diminishing in circumference to the top, which is crowned by a large bow with the addition of a couple of flags." Isaac Mendes Belisario (1795–1849) was a Jamaican artist of Jewish descent and active in Kingston Jamaica around British emancipation in 1833. The image shown here, as well as others of “John-Canoes,” was drawn from life by Belisario in 1836. This lithograph is one of twelve originally published in three parts, four plates at a time. See also image Belisario04.
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