Takie-Takie

Description

"Takie-Takie" (caption translation). This image shows a group of women, including an elderly lady, engaged in informal conversation. One of the women is nursing her child. Benoit explained how "slave women are in general excellent mothers, and as soon as they begin to breast feed their children they abstain from any physical contact with their husbands. During the period that they breast-feed, he writes, they can relax and have time to engage in takie-takie or gossip sessions" (p. 54). "Talkie-talkie" likely refers to Sranan, a widely used creole language of Suriname which combines grammatical elements of European, West African and indigenous languages with vocabulary elements mainly of English and Dutch origin. Pierre Jacques Benoit (1782-1854) was a Belgian artist, who visited the Dutch colony of Suriname on his own initiative for several months in 1831. He stayed in Paramaribo, but visited plantations, maroon communities and indigenous villages inland.

Source

"Figure 88" in Pierre Jacques Benoit, Voyage à Surinam; description des possessions néerlandaises dans la Guyane (Bruxelles: Société des Beaux-Arts de Wasme et Laurent, 1839).

Creator

Benoit, Pierre Jacques

Language

French

Rights

Image is in the public domain. Metadata is available under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International.

Identifier

BEN2

Spatial Coverage

South America--Suriname--Paramaribo

Citation

"Takie-Takie", Slavery Images: A Visual Record of the African Slave Trade and Slave Life in the Early African Diaspora, accessed September 18, 2020, http://www.slaveryimages.org/s/slaveryimages/item/2364
"Takie-Takie" (caption translation). This image shows a group of women, including an elderly lady, engaged in informal conversation. One of the women is nursing her child. Benoit explained how "slave women are in general excellent mothers, and as soon as they begin to breast feed their children they abstain from any physical contact with their husbands. During the period that they breast-feed, he writes, they can relax and have time to engage in takie-takie or gossip sessions" (p. 54). "Talkie-talkie" likely refers to Sranan, a widely used creole language of Suriname which combines grammatical elements of European, West African and indigenous languages with vocabulary elements mainly of English and Dutch origin. Pierre Jacques Benoit (1782-1854) was a Belgian artist, who visited the Dutch colony of Suriname on his own initiative for several months in 1831. He stayed in Paramaribo, but visited plantations, maroon communities and indigenous villages inland.
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