Joseph Cinquez, the brave Congolese Chief, who prefers death to slavery

Description

Joseph Cinqué (ca. 1814–ca. 1879), also known as Sengbe Pieh, was Mende from the Upper Guinea Coast. He helped lead a revolt of many Africans on the Spanish slave ship, La Amistad. This portrait included text which provided biographical information and other details on Amistad revolt, including a quote from Cinqué's sober and moving speech to his comrades on board ship after the mutiny. According to the Library of Congress, this print was commissioned by the publisher of the New York Sun and advertised for sale in the newspaper's account of the capture of the Amistad, published on 31 August 1839.

Source

Lithograph by James (or Isaac ) Sheffield (New York: Moses Y. Beach, 1839). Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, LC-USZ62-12960.

Creator

Sheffield, James or Isaac

Date Created

1839

Language

English

Rights

Image is in the public domain. Metadata is available under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International.

Identifier

E002

Spatial Coverage

Africa--Senegambia
North America--Connecticut

Citation

"Joseph Cinquez, the brave Congolese Chief, who prefers death to slavery", Slavery Images: A Visual Record of the African Slave Trade and Slave Life in the Early African Diaspora, accessed February 27, 2020, http://www.slaveryimages.org/s/slaveryimages/item/2543
Joseph Cinqué (ca. 1814–ca. 1879), also known as Sengbe Pieh, was Mende from the Upper Guinea Coast. He helped lead a revolt of many Africans on the Spanish slave ship, La Amistad. This portrait included text which provided biographical information and other details on Amistad revolt, including a quote from Cinqué's sober and moving speech to his comrades on board ship after the mutiny. According to the Library of Congress, this print was commissioned by the publisher of the New York Sun and advertised for sale in the newspaper's account of the capture of the Amistad, published on 31 August 1839.
IIIF Manifest Download