On Board a Slave Ship

Description

This image depicts enslaved Africans being loaded onto an unidentified slave ship at an unknown place. The image shown here has been cropped from a larger illustration shown, for example, on the Getty Images/Hulton Archive website (image 3324442). The same image appears on the Mary Evans Picture Library (London) website, but with no caption (picture # 10011127). Although the MEPL vaguely cites Cassell's History of England as the primary source, we have been unable to verify the citation in several editions of Cassell's history and the citation may be wrong. The image has also been published in a number of secondary sources and websites, but never with a primary source given. Whatever the case, this illustration appears to be based on an artist's imagination, rather than an eyewitness drawing. The artist might have been Paul Edouard Rischgitz (1828–1909), who was a Swiss draughtsman, landscape painter and etcher.

Source

J. F. Ade Ajayi and Michael Crowder (eds.), Historical Atlas of Africa (Harlow, Essex, England, 1985), chap. 42. Original source not identified.

Language

English

Rights

Image is in the public domain. Metadata is available under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International.

Identifier

E021

Spatial Coverage

Atlantic

Citation

"On Board a Slave Ship", Slavery Images: A Visual Record of the African Slave Trade and Slave Life in the Early African Diaspora, accessed April 2, 2020, http://www.slaveryimages.org/s/slaveryimages/item/2559
This image depicts enslaved Africans being loaded onto an unidentified slave ship at an unknown place. The image shown here has been cropped from a larger illustration shown, for example, on the Getty Images/Hulton Archive website (image 3324442). The same image appears on the Mary Evans Picture Library (London) website, but with no caption (picture # 10011127). Although the MEPL vaguely cites Cassell's History of England as the primary source, we have been unable to verify the citation in several editions of Cassell's history and the citation may be wrong. The image has also been published in a number of secondary sources and websites, but never with a primary source given. Whatever the case, this illustration appears to be based on an artist's imagination, rather than an eyewitness drawing. The artist might have been Paul Edouard Rischgitz (1828–1909), who was a Swiss draughtsman, landscape painter and etcher.
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