A Brazilian Sedan-Chair & a Person Begging for the Church

Description

This image shows a white woman being carried by two liveried male servants in Bahia. James Henderson (c. 1783-1848) was a British traveler who traveled all through Brazil between 1819 and 1820. He made all of his sketches from his observations. The Brazilian scholar, "Gilberto Freyre writes: Within their hammocks and palanquins the gentry permitted themselves to be carried about by Negroes for whole days at a time, some of them travelling in this manner from one plantation to another, while others employed this mode of transport in the streets; when acquaintances met, it was the custom to draw up alongside one another and hold a conversation" (The Masters and the Slaves (New York, 1956), p. 409-410, 428).

Source

James Henderson, A History of the Brazil. . . (London, 1821), facing p. 336. Copy in The Newberry Library, Chicago.

Creator

Henderson, James

Language

English

Rights

Image is in the public domain. Metadata is available under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International.

Identifier

HENDERSON5

Spatial Coverage

South America--Brazil--Bahia

Citation

"A Brazilian Sedan-Chair & a Person Begging for the Church", Slavery Images: A Visual Record of the African Slave Trade and Slave Life in the Early African Diaspora, accessed April 5, 2020, http://www.slaveryimages.org/s/slaveryimages/item/471
This image shows a white woman being carried by two liveried male servants in Bahia. James Henderson (c. 1783-1848) was a British traveler who traveled all through Brazil between 1819 and 1820. He made all of his sketches from his observations. The Brazilian scholar, "Gilberto Freyre writes: Within their hammocks and palanquins the gentry permitted themselves to be carried about by Negroes for whole days at a time, some of them travelling in this manner from one plantation to another, while others employed this mode of transport in the streets; when acquaintances met, it was the custom to draw up alongside one another and hold a conversation" (The Masters and the Slaves (New York, 1956), p. 409-410, 428).
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